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ESG

The author, Silvia Sanchez, graduated from the University of Alberta with a B.A. in Psychology and has over 15 years of experience in the career-consulting field.

Personal Services Standards Section 1- Operators’ Duties

protocols and procedures

The newly amended Personal Services Standards dictate:

SECTION 1: OPERATOR’S DUTIES

Personal Services Worker Skills and Knowledge

1.1 The operator must ensure that personal services workers have the skills and knowledge to:

1.1.1  Follow labeled instructions for use of disinfectants and antiseptic products.

1.1.2  Classify equipment in accordance with Standard 3.6 of these Standards.

1.1.3  Follow the written procedures required under Standards 1.5, 1.6, and 1.7 of these Standards.

1.1.4  Where applicable, follow the manufacturer’s instructions, or alternate written procedures approved by an Executive Officer, for the safe use of energy-emitting equipment or cosmetic products.

1.1.5  Where applicable, follow manufacturer’s instructions for use of piercing guns, steam sterilizers, and instrument washer-disinfectors.

*ESG NOTE: It is up to the business owner to ensure that all staff have a functioning level of the English language and will be able to understand written instructions on all tools and equipment.

ESG TIP: Include a section in your interviews that allows you to assess a candidate’s English reading skills. For example, ask them to pair disinfectants with their intended use based on the instructions on the bottle. This may seem out of the ordinary but it may go a long way in protecting your business. A simple mistake can have reverberating consequences.

Notification to Regional Health Authority (RHA) 

1.2  The operator of an existing personal service business must notify the RHA of:

1.2.1  the name and contact information of the operator of the business;

1.2.2  the address and location information where personal services are/will be provided; and

1.2.3  all personal services and activities that the business currently offers.

1.3  Operators of all existing personal services businesses must complete the requirements under Standard 1.2 within three (3) months of these Standards coming into force.

1.4  The operator of a personal service business must notify the RHA prior to offering any new personal service, or performing a new activity as part of a personal service.

*ESG NOTE: The RHA in Alberta is Alberta Health Services. Remember, these amendments are coming into effect JULY 1, 2020.

Written Procedures

1.5 The operator must ensure that facility-specific written procedures are established that describe steps for:

1.5.1 when applicable, the cleansing of skin and mucous membrane and the application of antiseptic products;

Personal Services Standards 1.5.2  post-service care for personal services that involve puncturing skin or mucous membrane;

1.5.3  client care in the event of an accidental skin cut or puncture;

1.5.4  where applicable, decontamination of any sink that will be used for both handwashing and equipment reprocessing;

1.5.5  where applicable, operating and maintaining a mobile sink; and

1.5.6  if performing sterilization, actions to be taken following a failed sterility indicator or unexplained physical parameter change.

1.6  For the purpose of requesting approval from an Executive Officer, facility-specific written procedures are required when an operator intends to allow personal services workers to:

1.6.1  use energy-emitting equipment or cosmetic products in a manner that is inconsistent with the manufacturer’s instructions; and

1.6.2  perform immediate-use steam sterilization.

1.7  In addition to the requirements described in Standards 1.5 and 1.6, operators of mobile businesses must ensure that business-specific written procedures are established that describe steps for:

1.7.1  hand hygiene;

1.7.2  transportation that ensures the separation of clean from contaminated supplies and equipment;

1.7.3  handling of single-use, porous, and uncleanable equipment;

1.7.4  reprocessing of reusable equipment;

1.7.5  cleaning and disinfection of client service areas; and

1.7.6  storage at a base of operations.

1.8  Written procedures must be reviewed, and revised if necessary, by the operator:

1.8.1  before a new process, activity, or instrumentation related to a personal service is introduced;

1.8.2  if an injury or infection to a client occurs; and

1.8.3  if ordered to do so by an Executive Officer.

1.9  Written procedures must incorporate the applicable requirements set out in these Standards.

*ESG NOTE: Signage, signage, signage! Basically, the updated guidelines recommend that you have signs for your staff everywhere, and we couldn’t agree more. Written protocol for each service offered at your business  maintains consistency by ensuring all staff members are delivering the same level of service to all clients, at all times.  

ESG TIP: If you do not have protocols nd procedures already, create some! Sure, it’s a tedious process, but just think of it as a strong foundation for a business that will become your legacy. Once you have created your documents, call a team meeting to review the document and answer any questions.

ESG TIP #2: Review all protocols and procedures with your team once per year minimum, or as often as needed. Habits often form subconsciously and you or your team members may find that you have drifted from the official protocol. An annual meeting calibrates any deviations.


If you are new to the beauty industry and are operating a home business, we recommend our Canadian Spa Industry Standards course to ensure that your business meets regulatory requirements and obligations for the protection of public health and your growing business.


EXECUTIVE SPA GROUP

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beauty industry,beauty industry careers,botox,injectables,nurse colleges,regulations

Alberta Nurses expected to join Beauty Industry in light of massive job cuts

beauty industry resource centre

Last November, The National Post reported that Alberta Health aims to eliminate 500 nursing jobs over the next three years in an effort to find efficiency in the budget.

Not surprisingly, we have had nurses come to us for guidance on how they can use their training and experience in the beauty industry.

Nurses working with injectables.

Nurses who join the beauty industry are often interested in offering injectables. Botox and fillers are amongst the fastest growing services in the beauty industry,

Alberta Health asks 3 questions when it comes to injectables:

  1. Who can buy it?
  2. Who prescribed it?
  3. Who administers it?

If you a member of any college of nursing in Alberta (such as CARNA, CLPNA, or CPSA) you have to check with your college to see what you as a member are allowed to administer as a nursing professional.

If you want to provide aesthetic services, there are multiple medispas that hire RNs to administer injectables. For example, some spas work directly with doctors who are able to get and prescribe the injectables and the RN administers it.

Each manufacturer may have their own rules around a physician being present in the facility when injections are being administered. You will have to contact the manufacturers in question and inquire about their specific instructions.


Cosmetic Botox® and Nurse Colleges

Botox is a Schedule 1 drug and therefore requires a prescription. Once a prescription has been written, it is currently up to each college to decide whether to allow their members to administer the drug, and under what conditions.

Botox® Manufacturer’s instructions

ALLERGAN’s instructions for use of Botox generally state that injections can only be given by physicians with the appropriate qualifications and experience in the treatment and the use of required equipment.

Who can buy it?

The sale of Botox is regulated federally. Only certain health professionals can purchase this drug legally.

Illegal Cosmetic Botox

Health Canada says is very interested in any inappropriate sales of Botox®. Alberta Health asks you report any suspected illegal sale of Botox.

Cosmetic Botox® and Alberta Health Violations

Alberta Health is not proposing a policy on the use of drugs in personal service settings, but, if reports arise that Botox is being offered in an unsanitary manner, steps will be taken by health inspectors to correct those violations.

The amended Personal Services Regulation and Standards require an operator using cosmetic Botox to follow any accompanying instructions for safe use.

Alberta Health Inspectors may also take referral steps if an inspector suspected irregularity with the purchase, prescription or administration of the drug. These referrals might be to a regulatory college, Health Canada, Alberta Health or to administrators the Pharmacy Act.


Classification of Dermal Fillers

Dermal fillers (Polymethyl-methacrylate microspheres (PMMA) and Hyaluronic Acid) are neither a drug, nor a cosmetic. Rather they are a Class 3 medical device (given how far they are inserted into the body).

Sale of Class 3 medical devices

There are no restrictions placed on these devices by Health Canada as to who can sell them. Some manufacturer’s state that the fillers are only to be used by a health care practitioner.

Dermal fillers and Alberta Health

The newly updated Personal Services Standards regulate the use of fillers to require that they carry the product name, a list of ingredients and instructions for safe use. Also, any instructions for safe use must be followed by the operator.


EXECUTIVE SPA GROUP

Beauty Industry Resource Centre

(780) 604-2772

info@executivespagroup.com

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alberta,alberta health,beauty careers,beauty industry resource centre,business resources,canada,guidelines,personal services standards,regulations

Personal Service Standards 2020 Updates for Beauty Industry Workers

beauty industry resource centre
2020 is bringing many anticipated changes to government-regulated industry standards.

The year 2020 is bringing many anticipated changes to government-regulated industry standards.

While some occupations in the beauty industry are heavily regulated, others remain relatively unsupervised. This has led to numerous consumer complaints varying from spa and worker hygiene to severe injury resulting from negligence to Alberta Health and Alberta Health Services.

Through discussions with industry representatives, business owners, and provincial, territorial and federal health partners and stakeholders, the government of Alberta (Alberta Health) has updated previous Health Standards and Guidelines. For clarification purposes, the new updates apply to all types of personal services businesses including commercial, home-based, mobile, special-event, and vehicle-based businesses.

This article breaks down and interprets the updates into 5 sections of the Personal Services Standards guidelines.

If you are new to the beauty industry and are operating a home business, we recommend our Canadian Spa Industry Standards course to ensure that your business meets regulatory requirements and obligations for the protection of public health and your growing business.


SECTION 1- OPERATIOR’S DUTIES

SECTION 2 – PERSONAL SERVICES WORKERS’ DUTIES

SECTION 3- COMING SOON


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beauty careers,handshakes,nail technicians,spa jobs,speed waxing,waxing training

What does your handshake say about you?

Do you shake your client’s hand the first time you meet them or do you believe it is an antiquated practice?

The estheticians of yesteryear were trained to shake the hand of the client as they introduced themselves for the first time. In fact, many estheticians trained abroad still practice the handshake.

Call us old fashioned, but we still believe in the handshake. It’s a show of respect and professionalism. Shaking your client’s hand when you first meet them adds a touch of class to your salon or spa.

WHAT DOES YOUR HANDSHAKE SAY ABOUT YOU?

People use different handshakes. It is important to know what message your handshake is sending to the receiver.

Types of Handshakes

Jell-O hand: this handshake is often interpreted as a sign of passiveness, weakness, lack of energy, or drive. This handshake tells your customer that you are lacking confidence in your position. For the receiver of this handshake they can be left feeling awkward after this limp shake.

Death grip: this handshake is aggressive and firm, but often too firm for the receiver leaving their hand feeling numb or pained. Although the giver of this handshake is attempting to portray dominance and assertiveness, it can be seen as overly aggressive or offensive in some situations. This handshake is not appropriate for the nature of the beauty industry and should be avoided in customer service.

Hand Cradle: this handshake is used as a display of affection. The giver of the handshake can use this as an opportunity to show the receiver that they are protective, caring, and trustworthy. It is most commonly used and most appropriately used between individuals who share a bond or emotional connection. Similar to a hug, it can be considered inappropriate in a customer service setting, or first interaction.

Missionary: this handshake is a display of dominance. It involves the giver turning their palm down leaving the other individuals palm turned up. The giver in this situation is showing that they feel superior or dominant over the other individual. This handshake should be reserved for situations in which a powerful statement is to be made. Refrain from using this handshake in customer service situations, or with your authority.

Lady fingers: this courteous handshake is used by women when greeting a man. It is used to keep distance between the lady and her greeter by extending her arm towards him and allowing only her fingers to be grasped. This handshake is not inappropriate in a customer service interaction, even with male customers.

The go-to shake: this handshake is appropriate for most situations as it is neither overpowering nor lacking in confidence. This handshake involves a comfortable grasp and a quick 3 second shake. Both parties’ hands are vertical and exert an equal amount of pressure. This handshake tells your customer that you are a professional and consider them equals in your interaction. Always ensure you are making eye contact with your greeter when shaking their hand. TIP: If the person is holding your hand for too long gently place your other hand over theirs and pull away.


Are you interested in joining the beauty industry? ESG is a Beauty Industry Resource Centre. Our Career and Employment Consultant is ready to help you design a career path that is right for you!

We recommend starting off with esthetics basics like Waxing.


Looking for jobs in beauty? Try our job bank.

Visit our job bank for Beauty jobs in Edmonton and area. It is Alberta Beauty Industry- focused and contains up-to-date job listings in Alberta. ESG offers short training courses to help you reach your goals one step at a time.

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mental health,mental models,psychology,workplace

Workplace Mental Models in 2020

metal models at work
How do your mental models influence your behaviour at work?

If 2019 was a tough year for you, don’t worry, a new decade is here! No matter the challenges of last year, we’re here to share with you the recipe for happiness and satisfaction in 2020. In this post, we hope to shed light on the subconscious mind and how it dictates your luck through mental models.

The New Year or birthdays are a great time to reset your thinking because it provides a memorable timeline to help you measure your progress.
Whether you know it or not, you practice mental models in your everyday life.

What are mental models?

Mental models are a collection of thoughts that make up your subconscious attitude.

Over the years and unbeknownst to you, your mind has been creating mental models as a result of your childhood experiences and your perceptions as an adult. Subconsciously, your mind uses the mental models it created to anticipate the results of an event or decision, and also to reason and explain your choices, good or bad.

Let’s look at some examples of mental models. Do any of the following phrases sound familiar to you?

▸ I can’t”
▸ “Why speak up? It won’t make a difference”
▸ “If I want something done right I have to do it myself”
▸ “I don’t care”
▸ “I have no time”
▸ “What’s the point?”

Can you think of a time when your mental models influenced a decision you made in the workplace?

Examples of mental models in the workplace sound like this…

▸ “Seniority rules”
▸ “We can’t be all things to all people”
▸ “Don’t rock the boat”
▸ “Who do they think we are”
▸ “We don’t have the resources”
▸ “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it”

But how do mental models influence luck?

The Law of Attraction is the theory that you attract positivity into your life by having a positive outlook on life. The premise is that you can think or speak something into existence. Sounds like hocus pocus right?

There’s a psychological explanation to this theory. Most people understand this theory to work with the following formula:

A leads to B, where “A” represents your “positive” thoughts and “B” represents your reward

However, the Law of Attraction has much to do with you mental models. The law works under the belief that positive mental models allow your brain to recognize when good things are happening to you in life. In other words, your brain’s “radar” is turned on to see opportunities and possibilities as “luck”.

So it’s not that you “attact” something that wasn’t there before, it’s that your mind attributes a positive emotion (gratitude) to a particular event or experience that is happening to you anyway. When you reset your brain’s mental models, this creates a self-feeding cycle of proof for you that good things do happen to you, no matter the size or significance of event or experience.

Examples of positive mental models are:

▸ “I can do it”
▸ “People are fundamentally good”
▸ “We all have our bad days”

Mental models impact behaviour and can either help us achieve our goals or block us from achieving them. Don’t feel bad if some of your mental models need some rethinking- they live in our subconscious where they lurk until we shed a spotlight on them.

How can we change our mental models?

The first step is simply to be aware of your thoughts. Next time you come across a challenge, identify the problem in order to plan a solution.

Planning and organization is the best way to overcome things that scare us. Once you have a plan in order, put it into action and observe the results for future reference. This in turn will recalibrate your brain’s mental models.

Self reflection

When good things happen to you, do you see them as a blessing, or just dumb luck?


EXECUTIVE SPA GROUP

Beauty Industry Resource Centre

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Executive Spa Group

info@executivespagroup.com
(780) 604-2772
executivespagroup.com
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